Posts in Anti-Oppression + Racism + Food Justice
Our Workplace Justice Series: the Abolition of the Prison Industrial Complex

Currently, 11 out of 22 of our staff members have been formerly incarcerated, and we believe our work at Planting Justice directly contributes to reducing the level of mass incarceration - we’ve offered employment to 18 different men returning home from prison, with a zero percent recidivism rate. And, despite our efforts, the Prison Industrial Complex still operates as a violent beast that is disproportionately stealing and enslaving people of color from our communities. Hear our take on the Prison Industrial Complex here.

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Speak Out to Stay Put - Calling all Oakland residents!

Oakland is in crisis. Our rent are rising faster than any other city in the U.S. As of 2010, Oakland had lost over 25% of our Black residents to displacement - a trend that has accelerated over the last five years. Our elected leaders are either in denial or actively working to promote gentrification. We need a new plan.

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Black Farmers & Urban Gardeners Conference - #BUGsOakland2015

BUGS is "an organization of volunteers committed to building networks and community support for growers in both rural and urban settings. Through education and advocacy around food and farm issues, we nurture collective Black leadership to ensure we have a seat at the table." This year, the conference will be held in Oakland, from October 16th-18th at Laney College. Sign up to attend, volunteer, or be a vendor.

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Workplace Justice Series on Racism and Police Violence

In response to the killing of black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Planting Justice identified “Racism and Police Violence” as a form of oppression we wanted to address in our quarterly, day-long Workplace Justice trainings. After several months of Black Lives Matter direct actions taking place in cities across the U.S., Planting Justice staff members came together on a rainy day in January to dialogue about lived experiences of structural, systemic, institutionalized, and interpersonal racism, especially the impacts of police terrorism and the history of, as Angela Davis describes, “the unbroken line of police violence in the US that takes us all the way back to the days of slavery.” Read more to hear what we learned and discussed.

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